Research at NIFs

Research and Publications


1.  Efficacy of Exercise for Menopausal Symptoms: a randomized controlled trial.

Sternfeld B, Guthrie KA, Ensrud KE, LaCroix, Larson JC, Dunn AL, Anderson GL, Seguin RA, Carpenter JS,
Newton KM, Reed SD, Freeman EW, Cohen LS, Joffe H, Roberts M, Caan BJ.

Menopause: The Journal of The North American Menopause Society, 2014, 21(4), 330-338.
NOTE: This study was part of the second clinical trial to be conducted as part of the Menopausal Strategies –
Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health (MsFLASH) study, a National Institute of Aging funded network of investigators
and clinical trials designed to test alternative methods to alleviate the most common, bothersome symptoms of the menopausal transition.

2.  Design and methods of a multi-site, multi-behavioral treatment trial for menopausal symptoms: The MsFLASH experience.

Barbara Sternfeld, Andrea LaCroix, Bette J. Caan, Andrea L. Dunn, Katherine M. Newton, Susan D. Reed,
Katherine A. Guthrie, Cathryn Booth-LaForce, Karen J. Sherman, Lee Cohen, Marlene P. Freeman, Janet S. Carpenter,
Julie R. Hunt, Melanie Roberts, Kristine E. Ensrud

Contemporary Clinical Trials, 2013, 35, 25-34.
NOTE: This study was part of the second clinical trial to be conducted as part of the Menopausal Strategies –
Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health (MsFLASH) study, a National Institute of Aging funded network of investigators
and clinical trials designed to test alternative methods to alleviate the most common, bothersome symptoms of the menopausal transition.

3.  Motivational factors influencing older adults to participate in an exercise program.

T.M. Daush, A.E. Mikesky, FACSM, S.M. Perkins, M. Roberts, K.S. Maharry, J. O’Dea, Indiana University, Indianapolis,
National Institute for Fitness and Sport, Indianapolis, IN.

Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 2005, 13, 45-60.
NOTE: This data was drawn from a three-year study, Effects of Strength Training on Knee Osteoarthritis, an NIH funded research project.


4.  Airways Hyperresponsiveness in High School Athletes. 

Edward T. Mannix, Melanie Roberts, Heather Dukes, Carolyn Mages and Mark Farber.  

Journal of Asthma, August 2004, 41(5), 567-575.

5.  Fitness levels of firefighter recruits before and after a supervised exercise training program. 

M. Roberts, J. O’Dea, A. Boyce, E. Mannix.

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research , 2002, 16(2), 271-277
Presented at American College of Sports Medicine National Conference, June 2000.
    

6.  The prevalence of exercise induced asthma in members of a training facility. Ed

Mannix, M. Roberts, K.D. Rivas, M.O. Farber.  An ongoing study designed toDetermine the prevalence of exercise induced
asthma in regularly exercising NIFS members.

Am J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 159:A415, 1999.
       

7.  The prevalence of exercise induced asthma in firefighters. 

Reid, B.R., Y.A. Rawles, M. Roberts, M.O. Farber, E.T. Mannix.

Journal of Investigative Medicine 12-99.


Additional Project

The MsFLASH 02 study entitled, “Interventions for Relief of Menopausal Symptoms:  A 3-by-2 Factorial Design Examining Yoga, Exercise, and Omega-3 Supplementation” was a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) testing three low-risk interventions for reducing the frequency and/or relieving the bothersomeness of vasomotor symptoms (VMS). This study was the second clinical trial to be conducted as part of the Menopausal Strategies – Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health (MsFLASH) study, a National Institute of Aging funded network of investigators and clinical trials designed to test alternative methods to alleviate the most common, bothersome symptoms of the menopausal transition.  

In this study, 374 women aged 40-62 and in the late menopausal transition or postmenopausal experiencing an average of 4 or more VMS per day were randomized to one of three behavioral intervention groups: yoga, exercise, or the usual activity group; and simultaneously all randomized to receive omega-3 supplementation or a matching placebo. The trial was conducted at three MsFLASH network sites (Seattle, Oakland, and Indianapolis).  

Women randomized to the yoga arm attended a weekly class with a trained instructor and practiced at home on other days; those in the exercise arm attended supervised aerobic exercise sessions  three times per week; women randomized to the usual activity group were asked to follow their usual physical activity routine.  All women, including those randomized to the usual activity group received a placebo pill or 2 g dose of high-quality omega-3 daily. Each woman participated for a total of 15 weeks.

This study included yoga, aerobic exercise, and omega-3 supplementation. Half of the women in the yoga group, half of the women in the exercise group and half of the women in the usual activity group received an omega-3 supplement pill daily and the other half received a placebo omega-3 supplement pill daily. In this approach all women received some apparent intervention (yoga, exercise, and/or supplement). Giving all women the active or placebo omega-3 pill addresses the question of treatment expectancy, which is central to the issue of attention control groups.

For more information on Research Programs at NIFS please contact Melanie Roberts, Fitness Center Director, at 317-274-3432 ext. 217 or by email.